South Korea’s aggressive coronavirus testing gives clues to fatality rate

Large-scale testing in South Korea has provided perhaps the most credible look at the lethality of the new coronavirus as it continues its global spread.

Within a month of confirming its first case of the new coronavirus on January 20, South Korea had tested nearly 8,000 people suspected of infection. A little over a week later, that number had soared to 82,000 as health officials mobilized to carry out as many 10,000 tests each day.

(Where did the coronavirus come from? How to prevent infections? Here’s what we’ve learned so far about the coronavirus.) 

Neighboring Japan, on the other hand, tested only a fraction of that number, with fewer than 2,000 people checked on any given day since the beginning of its outbreak in late January. 

So far, more than 6,000 cases have been confirmed in South Korea and over 1,000 in Japan, if you include the Diamond Princess cruise ship that was quarantined in the Port of Yokohoma.

In the United States, where the number of confirmed cases has surpassed 200, health authorities had as recently as this week tested fewer than 500 people in total, hindered by legal and technical barriers

to mass screening.

New research suggests the coronavirus may have spread for weeks undetected in the US State of Washington.

Which is where South Korea’s massive testing effort can come in, providing a valuable reference point for public health experts around the world who are starved of hard data – offering potentially the most comprehensive picture yet of the threat posed by Covid-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus, to the general public.

And while experts caution that it is still too early to draw firm conclusions, the picture emerging in South Korea – which has the most confirmed cases outside China but with a more transparent political environment – suggests the virus could be less lethal than patchier data emerging from elsewhere.

“If we can test more people – whether they have no symptoms, mild or severe disease – the results, including the case fatality rate, are more accurate and representative when the whole disease spectrum is taken into consideration,” said David Hui Shu-cheong, an expert in respiratory medicine at the Chinese University of Hong Kong. 

“Most countries just focus on testing the hospitalized patients who obviously have more severe disease, and [thus] the fatality rate is high.”

As of Friday, the coronavirus has sickened 80,555 people and killed 3,042 in China.

Version:1.0 StartHTML:000000284 EndHTML:000224017 StartFragment:000030641 EndFragment:000223954 StartSelection:000031165 EndSelection:000223918 SourceURL:https://www.inkstonenews.com/health/south-koreas-aggressive-coronavirus-testing-gives-clues-fatality-rate/article/3073945 South Korea’s aggressive coronavirus testing gives clues to fatality rate – Inkstone

South Korea, which introduced a system to grant the rapid approval of testing kits for viruses after 2015’s outbreak of Middle East respiratory syndrome in the country that killed 38 people, has won international plaudits for the scale and speed of its screening regime, which includes drive-through stations that can test members of the public in minutes.

This week, President Moon Jae-in went so far as to declare “war” on the virus and as of Thursday, health authorities had tested more than 140,000 people.

One question puzzling disease experts has been Covid-19’s mortality rate, which has seemingly ranged from 2-3% in China up to 10% in Iran, based on official numbers – though given the opaque nature of both countries’ political systems, these figures have been dogged by doubts, with some scientists suggesting that the illness caused by the new coronavirus is actually less deadly than the severe acute respiratory syndrome.

World Health Organization Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus on Tuesday said the global mortality rate from Covid-19 recorded so far was about 3.4%, higher than previous estimates – though this figure was accompanied by caveats that the rate could be lower when more was known about the disease.

Yet in South Korea, where the country’s Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Friday reported 6,284 cases and 40 deaths, the mortality rate appears to be hovering around 0.64%.South Korean soldiers spray disinfectant at a shopping street in Seoul. South Korean soldiers spray disinfectant at a shopping street in Seoul. Photo: AP/Ahn Young-joon

While this is still several times more lethal than seasonal influenza, which kills about 0.1% of the people it infects – 30,000-40,000 people in the US alone each year – South Korea’s rate is far lower than that seen elsewhere.

Although various factors can affect mortality rates, including the quality of a country’s health care system and the amount of public and medical knowledge about what to do in an outbreak, the number of people being tested is one of the most influential. 

All other things being equal, the more people tested, the more accurate the mortality rate will be.

William Schaffner, a professor of preventive medicine and infectious diseases at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, said South Korea had emerged as a “wonderful laboratory” for studying the virus.

“During the course of subsequent investigations, as we start testing more broadly, we discover, almost always, that there is a broader spectrum of illness,” he said.

“The more you test the more you are likely to complete the picture of the entire pyramid, and so the more you test, it becomes [self-evident] that the perceived fatality rate will diminish.”Lee Man-hee, leader of the Shincheonji Church of Jesus. The church has been blamed for contributing to the spread of the disease in South Korea. Lee Man-hee, leader of the Shincheonji Church of Jesus. The church has been blamed for contributing to the spread of the disease in South Korea. Photo: AFP

The argument that South Korea’s lower death rate may be more representative of the risk posed by the virus has been bolstered by some of the data out of China, where more than 80,000 cases have been reported.

In a study released last month, the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention said the mortality rate among people whose symptoms started between January 1 and January 10 was 15.6%, compared to just 0.8% among those who showed symptoms between February 1 and February 11 – a possible indication that increased screening as awareness of the virus grew had detected more mild cases of infection. 

Chinese authorities have reported testing some 320,000 people in Guangdong province, but the total number of people tested across the country remains unclear.

Jeremy Rossman, an honorary senior lecturer in virology at the University of Kent in the UK, said he believed the true fatality rate was significantly lower than observed in China and especially the city of Wuhan – the epicenter of the outbreak – where about 4% of patients are reported to have died.

“It is hard to know exactly which factors are at play in which country,” Rossman said, adding there may have been significant under-reporting of cases in Wuhan. “Regardless, I do think it’s likely that the fatality rate is closer to 0.5%, which is indeed very good news.”

Schaffner, too, said he found a fatality rate of around 0.5% broadly credible.People line up to buy face masks in South Korea. People line up to buy face masks in South Korea. Photo: Reuters/Kim Kyung-Hoon

“It would be a cause for optimism and would stand in contrast with the way the coronavirus has been presented, particularly by television announcers, who almost invariably precede the word ‘coronavirus’ with the word ‘deadly,’” he said.

“Having a much lower fatality rate would put the lie to that, and although it would be indeed higher than influenza, it would be down in the seasonal influenza range and very different than Sars and Mers, the other coronaviruses that we know about that have jumped species.”

Others struck a more cautious note, pointing out the fatality rate in South Korea could rise as newly diagnosed patients begin suffering the worst effects of the virus in the days and weeks ahead.

“Given that cases typically die 1-3 weeks after onset, the case-fatality rate can artificially be reduced with an initial wave of newly diagnosed, new onset cases,” said Michael T. Osterholm, director of the Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy at the University of Minnesota. 

“Only after three weeks to a month can you calculate a reliable case-fatality rate for that group with onset the month before. So I think the case-fatality rate will go up, not down in Korea in the 30 to 60 days ahead.”

There is little disagreement, however, that countries such as the US, which bungled the production of its first diagnostic test kit and initially limited testing to travelers, should be learning from South Korea’s broad-based screening. 

Amid mounting criticism, the administration of President Donald Trump announced on Tuesday that the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention would lift all restrictions on testing, paving the way for mass screening by state, local and private laboratories.

“I’ve been yelling and screaming, as have many other people, about the need for testing capacity,” said Marc Lipsitch, a professor of epidemiology at Harvard University’s Harvard T.H Chan School of Public Health.

“The only way to know the severity spectrum is to test large numbers of people, and especially in outbreaks, it’s actually a really good setting to do it.”

John Power

John Power John is a contributor to Inkstone. He is a reporter for Asia Desk and This Week in Asia of the South China Morning Post.TRENDING SHARE u 1 Society ‘I’m worried about black people’: Uproar in China over plan to attract foreigners 2 Health Hong Kong says another dog has tested positive for the coronavirus 3 Health Scientists may have found out why the new coronavirus is so infectious 4 Health Run out of hand sanitizers? Try whisky (No, not drinking it) 5 Society Penniless and foreign in China? You could join a ‘white monkey show’ SHARE uScroll to see next article

Chinese migrants in Italy assess their options amid outbreak of coronavirus and racism
Chinese migrants in Italy assess their options amid outbreak of coronavirus and racism

Health

Chinese migrants in Italy assess their options amid outbreak of coronavirus and racism

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Thousands of Chinese migrants are questioning their future in the euro zone’s third-biggest economy as the coronavirus epidemic takes hold.

Wenzhou and Rome may be 5,800 miles apart, but public anxiety about the coronavirus is the same in both places.

This is especially true for the thousands of businesspeople from the eastern Chinese coastal city, who have moved to the Italian capital in the last few decades and established one of the biggest Chinese communities in the country.

About 100,000 people from Wenzhou, and another 100,000 from nearby Qingtian county, live in Italy, according to official Chinese data, with Milan also hosting a sizable Chinese community.

But many are considering their short- and long-term future as Italy reels from the coronavirus epidemic, which has killed more than 148 people and infected roughly 3,858 in the European country.Empty tables outside a restaurant at St Mark's Square in Venice on March 5. Italy's government has adopted a decree with emergency new measures to contain the coronavirus. Empty tables outside a restaurant at St Mark’s Square in Venice on March 5. Italy’s government has adopted a decree with emergency new measures to contain the coronavirus. Photo: Reuters/Manuel Silvestri

Wu Yue, a businessman from Fujian province who has lived in Rome for 20 years, said many Chinese in Italy were anxious and wondering if they should return home.

“We definitely feel safer in China. The government is more efficient … Hospitals here can treat patients well, but the government’s ability to respond to an emergency is not ideal,” Wu said.

Business is deteriorating in the euro zone’s third-biggest economy as the government tries to curb the spread of the coronavirus by shutting down schools and universities across the country and sealing off a dozen towns in northern Italy.

Italy has acted faster than other European countries in introducing public health measures, such as stopping all flights to and from China, although that was not fast enough to prevent the virus from reaching Italy.

On Wednesday, a study conducted by the University of Milan and Sacco Hospital confirmed that the coronavirus had been circulating in Italy several weeks before it was first detected there.Despite the flight ban, which China urged Italy to lift, it is still possible for Chinese tourists and businesspeople to return to China, by flying first to other European or international airports, and taking routes onward from there.

Wu said he heard that some Chinese had chartered flights back to China or transited Russia or Finland. 

“I thought about sending my wife and kids back, but I decided against it because of the risk [of being infected] during the 17-hour journey,” he said.

A Chinese student in Milan, who would only give her surname as Liang, said many of her fellow students had returned to China, but she decided to stay.

“I am lucky as I work part-time in a professional field, so I still get paid,” she said. “But some of my classmates work in restaurants that can’t keep them on because business is bad, so they just went home for the time being.”

For those who did go back to China, the next question is when to return to Italy.A man wearing a face mask rides a bike in a street at the Chinese district of Milan on February 25. A man wearing a face mask rides a bike in a street at the Chinese district of Milan on February 25. Photo: AFP/Miguel Medina

Chen Guangzhen has been stuck in Yongjia county in Wenzhou since he returned to China in December.

When the number of new coronavirus cases finally leveled off in Wenzhou, one of the worst-hit Chinese cities outside the epicenter of Hubei province, Chen prepared to return to Italy to run his grocery store near Rome.

Then things started worsening in Italy, forcing him to postpone his return again.

“I had booked a flight back on Sunday, but now I have to cancel it,” he said.

“As far as I know none of the Yongjia people in Italy have returned [to China] recently. We’re now encouraging them not to come back. After all, it’s riskier on the road than staying at home.” 

A bigger fear for the Chinese diaspora, though, is whether they still feel welcome amid sporadic racist incidents and remarks as some in Italy see China as the source of their suffering.

Luca Zaia, governor of the Veneto region – one of the three hardest-hit areas of northern Italy – was forced to apologize after he said on television last month that “it is a cultural fact that China has paid a big price for this epidemic because we have seen them all eat mice live or things like that.”

Stuart Lau

Stuart Lau Stuart is a contributor to Inkstone. He is Europe Correspondent for the South China Morning Post.

Mandy Zuo

Mandy Zuo emailMandy is a contributor to Inkstone, and a Shanghai-based China reporter for the South China Morning Post.Mar 062020More from this edition 4

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More than 100 Hong Kong restaurants refuse to serve customers from mainland China, investigation reveals
More than 100 Hong Kong restaurants refuse to serve customers from mainland China, investigation reveals

Society

More than 100 Hong Kong restaurants refuse to serve customers from mainland China, investigation reveals

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At least 100 restaurants Hong Kong have been found to refuse service to customers from mainland China. A human rights group calls for a wider definition of racial discrimination to cover prejudice against mainland Chinese.

More than 100 restaurants in Hong Kong have refused to serve diners from mainland China during the coronavirus outbreak, according to a human rights group that is warning firms against crossing the line into racial discrimination.

The Society for Community Organisation found the businesses were posting messages online or displaying notices at their premises barring Mandarin speakersThe overwhelming majority of Hong Kong residents speak Cantonese. and non-locals, while secret shopper visits revealed mainlanders were being turned away.Since early February, the Hong Kong government has closed most of its land borders shared with mainland China. Since early February, the Hong Kong government has closed most of its land borders shared with mainland China. Photo: AFP/Anthony Wallace

Richard Tsoi Yiu-cheong of the advocacy group said the health crisis did not justify discriminatory practices against visitors to the city and recent immigrants from the mainland.

“Of course restaurants should take different [public health] measures, but they should not do it in a way that strips some people of their rights or discriminates against them,” the veteran pro-democracy activist said in a press conference on Thursday.

The former British colony returned to Chinese rule in 1997 as a special territory with a high degree of autonomy. About 92% of the populations of both Hong Kong and mainland China are ethnic Han Chinese.

Hong Kong has 105 confirmed cases of the coronavirus originating from the central Chinese city of Wuhan, including two deaths. The virus, which causes the illness Covid-19, has infected more than 80,400 people on the mainland.

(Where did the coronavirus come from? How to prevent infections? Here’s what we’ve learned so far about the coronavirus.)

The human rights advocacy group scoured websites and the social media accounts of local restaurants and found 101 of them had posted messages of a discriminatory nature, including refusing to serve mainlanders and Mandarin speakers, or declaring they would only entertain locals.Richard Tsoi Yiu-cheong (left) and Wong Chi-yuen (right) hold a press conference on recent complaints about racial discrimination in restaurants. Richard Tsoi Yiu-cheong (left) and Wong Chi-yuen (right) hold a press conference on recent complaints about racial discrimination in restaurants. Photo: SCMP/May Tse

The investigation, conducted between February 15 and 28, also involved visits to 61 restaurants. It found 38 of them had displayed signs on their premises that did not welcome mainland customers. Investigators posed as Mandarin-speaking customers at 13 eateries and were denied service at five of them.

At one eatery, the researcher was asked to produce a Hong Kong identity card after speaking in Mandarin, the official language of the mainland, to ask for a table for one.

In another case, an investigator was rejected even though he told the restaurant staff where he was from and that he had not crossed the northern border in the past 14 days.

Tsoi said while denying service to everyone who had been to the mainland in the past 14 days did not discriminate against a particular group of people, restaurants would cross the line into racial discrimination if they imposed a blanket ban on all mainlanders.

The Race Discrimination Ordinance outlaws the discrimination, harassment and vilification of a person on the grounds of their race, which includes the race, color, descent, and the national or ethnic origin of the person.

Tsoi said the legislation should be amended to include nationality and resident status to better protect mainland visitors and those who had moved to the city.

Victor Ting

Victor Ting Victor is a contributor to Inkstone and a reporter at the South China Morning Post.Mar 062020More from this edition 4

Stay or go? Coronavirus outbreak forces Chinese in Italy to make tough choices

Hong Kong restaurants found to discriminate against diners from mainland China

The hard part of banning the consumption of wild animals? Defining them

‘Striking’ lack of regret led to Chinese star swimmer Sun Yang’s doping ban

Just how lethal is the coronavirus? South Korea may have the best answer

Combined Shape

Coronavirus: confusion arises over what China’s wildlife bans cover
Coronavirus: confusion arises over what China’s wildlife bans cover

Health

Coronavirus: confusion arises over what China’s wildlife bans cover

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New regulations on the trade and consumption of wild animals have sowed confusion and uncertainties over the future of some traditional delicacies in China.

Turtle soup, rice porridge with frog, snake soup, frog leg clay pot rice – could popular dishes in Chinese cuisine like these be off restaurant menus in China for good?

That’s the worry of chefs, food critics and restaurant owners after the Standing Committee of the National People’s Congress, China’s top lawmaking body, banned the trade and consumption of wild animals in late February as part of measures to contain the coronavirus outbreak.

The consumption of wild animals has drawn much government scrutiny, as both the current epidemic and the 2003 outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome (Sars) have been associated with markets in China selling meat from wild animals.

The Sars virus originated in bats and then likely spread to civets – a cat-like wild animal considered a delicacy in parts of southern China – in a wet market in the southern city of Foshan, before it infected humans.

The new coronavirus is believed to have spread from bats, possibly via snakes or pangolins, to humans in a market in the central Chinese city of Wuhan, where wild animals were sold in open-air markets.Turtles are being sold in a wet market in the southern city of Guangzhou in January 2018. Turtles are being sold in a wet market in the southern city of Guangzhou in January 2018. Photo: EPA-EFE

While the government has yet to define the meaning of “wild animals,” the municipal government in Shenzhen, a tech hub bordering Hong Kong, introduced draft regulations containing a “white list” of nine meats permitted for human consumption a few days after the resolution by the National People’s Congress. 

The list includes pork, beef, chicken and rabbit, along with fish and seafood, but excludes cats, dogs, snakes, turtles and frogs.

On January 26, the Huangsha Aquatic Products Market in Guangzhou, capital of southern Guangdong province, posted a notice banning the sale of farmed snakes, crocodiles, giant salamanders, and turtles, including Chinese soft-shelled turtles.

The Shenzhen Special Zone Daily newspaper quoted local authorities as saying they had decided not to publish a “black list” of banned meats because China has tens of thousands of species of wild animals and it was impossible for such a list to be comprehensive.

The lack of an exhaustive list of what is, and is not, allowed has led to widespread confusion in the restaurant industry in China. Frog leg clay pot rice is a popular dish in southern China. Frog leg clay pot rice is a popular dish in southern China. Photo: SCMP/Paul Yeung

Duan Ran, a member of China Fisheries Association who owns 11 restaurants, thinks that ingredients such as giant salamanders and snakes might be banned permanently. The giant salamander has been a legally protected animal in China since 1989.

Fried eight treasure giant salamander is a famous traditional dish in Shaanxi province in western China. Snake is consumed widely across southern China, especially in snake soup, which is made using the meat of several snake species along with chicken, pork, sugar cane, mandarin peel and white pepper.

Duan believes bans on eating frog and soft-shelled turtle will not be permanent, and that they will be lifted after the coronavirus outbreak is over, because of the long history of raising these animals for consumption in China.

“Among frog species, bullfrog constitutes a big market in China. There is also a seven-decade history of farming bullfrogs in China, with many people working in the industry. Bullfrog is considered a domesticated farmed animal,” he says.

Frog breeders in China have been among the most vocal in expressing their concerns about losing their livelihood following the ban. In Guangdong and Hainan, another southern province, breeders have posted online petitions appealing to authorities to allow them to keep rearing the animals despite the national ban on the wildlife trade.

In early March, a doctor in Wuhan, central China, where the coronavirus outbreak began, posted on Weibo, China’s answer to Twitter, a picture of the dishes provided at the hospital where he works, which included fried soft-shelled turtle. This led to great controversy online, with internet users criticizing the doctor for consuming wildlife.Workers in protective gear catch a giant salamander that was reported to have escaped from the Huanan Seafood Market in Wuhan, where the coronavirus infections were first reported, on January 27. Workers in protective gear catch a giant salamander that was reported to have escaped from the Huanan Seafood Market in Wuhan, where the coronavirus infections were first reported, on January 27. Photo: Chinatopix via AP

In addition to soft-shelled turtle and frog, there’s also uncertainty over the consumption of similar wild animal species that are bred on a large scale on farms, such as mudfish and swamp eel.

Paul Lu Yuguo, a Beijing chef and former deputy secretary-general of the Beijing Cuisine Association, says that the Chinese government’s ban on wildlife consumption will not affect the development of Chinese cuisine. “Wildlife does not represent Chinese cuisine food ingredients,” he says.

Hong Kong-based food critic and blogger K.C. Koo, of gourmetkc.com, also says that, since the farming of certain wild animals has a long history in China and can be regulated, the bans will be lifted after the coronavirus outbreak.

“Like the consumption of rabbits in Chengdu, it’s a long-established tradition. The rabbits are also not wild catch. The government wants to outlaw wanton killing and eating of wildlife. But frog farming is far from wanton killing and it [doesn’t make sense] to ban it.

“‘Wild animal’ is a broad term that can include wild ducks and chickens, too. Any animals that are not farmed can be regarded as wild. It will be difficult to ban all of them. Just certain animals that can pose a danger, like bats and civets, will be banned due to the current virus outbreak. But such animals never constituted a mainstream part of Chinese cuisine.”

Elaine Yau

Elaine Yau FBTWElaine Yau is a contributor to Inkstone. She covers culture for the South China Morning Post.Mar 062020More from this edition 4

Stay or go? Coronavirus outbreak forces Chinese in Italy to make tough choices

Hong Kong restaurants found to discriminate against diners from mainland China

The hard part of banning the consumption of wild animals? Defining them

‘Striking’ lack of regret led to Chinese star swimmer Sun Yang’s doping ban

Just how lethal is the coronavirus? South Korea may have the best answer

Combined Shape

Sun Yang: ‘Striking’ lack of remorse led to Chinese star swimmer’s doping ban
Sun Yang: ‘Striking’ lack of remorse led to Chinese star swimmer’s doping ban

Sports

Sun Yang: ‘Striking’ lack of remorse led to Chinese star swimmer’s doping ban

Photo: AP/Bernat Armangue Photo: AP/Bernat Armangue Triangle 4arrow leftarrow rightFBTWTWTWShapeemailubyJonathan White Get the Inkstone newsletter Inkstone covers politics, business and society in China to bring you fresh insight into a rising power. Daily: A daily digest of top China-focused stories. Weekend: Weekly highlights of the best stories from China. SIGN UP Please enter a valid email address By registering you must agree to our T&Cs

A 78-page report details the Court of Arbitration for Sport’s reason for giving the Chinese swimmer Sun Yang a harsh eight-year ban.

Chinese superstar swimmer Sun Yang paid for the “huge risk” he took in the controversial doping test that led to him being banned for eight years by the Court of Arbitration for Sport.

The court on Wednesday published its full report into the case brought by the World Anti-Doping Agency against Sun Yang and swimming governing body Fina, with the 78-page document making for damning reading.

The report is highly critical of Sun and his team for their actions from the out-of-competition test at his home in the eastern Chinese city of Hangzhou in September 2018 through to the end of the CAS hearing last November.Sun Yang said he will appeal the court's ruling. Sun Yang said he will appeal the court’s ruling. Photo: Xinhua/Fei Maohua

On the night of testing, Sun gave a blood sample before taking issue with the credentials of the testing team and refused to provide a urine sample. 

Sun, with the backing of his entourage, then ripped up his signed consent form and assisted a security guard in smashing a blood vial with a hammer.

The panel said that Sun “being a person experienced with anti-doping controls as he has participated in literally hundreds of them, must have realized that he was taking a huge risk by withdrawing a consent he had already given to cooperate in the blood sample collection session.”

“It was striking that, in the course of his testimony, at no point did the athlete express any regret as to his actions, or indicate that, with the benefit of hindsight, it might have been preferable for him to have acted differently.Sun Yang at a public hearing in Switzerland in November 2019. Sun Yang at a public hearing in Switzerland in November 2019. Photo: AP/Jean-Christophe Bott

“Rather, as the proceedings unfolded, he dug his heels in and, eventually, sought to blame others for the manifest failings that occurred. At no point, in the appreciation of the panel, did he confront the possibility that he might have overreacted in his actions.”

The report gave weight to a growing chorus of people calling for Sun to be stripped of his medals. 

Fina vice-president Matt Dunn told The Sydney Morning Herald it would be “open” to looking into the matter, but it will wait until the appeal process is over.

Sun’s lawyer stated he has 30 days to appeal the ruling, which was handed down on February 28. Sun said he will “definitely” appeal the verdict.

The CAS ruling can be overturned by the Swiss Federal Tribunal but successful appeals are rare. The 28-year-old said he “firmly” believes in his innocence. 

The CAS report concluded that Sun is “a world-class athlete, with an impressive list of sporting achievements; he is not, however, above the law or legal process.”

Because of his eight-year ban, Sun will miss the Tokyo Olympic Games scheduled to start on July 24, 2020.

Jonathan White

Jonathan White emailTWJonathan White joined the Post in 2017 after a decade reporting on sport from China. He originally moved to Beijing to coach football in 2007 and later spent two years in Shanghai.Mar 062020More from this edition

https://www.inkstonenews.com/health/south-koreas-aggressive-coronavirus-testing-gives-clues-fatality-rate/article/3073945

Combined Shape

Chinese migrants in Italy assess their options amid outbreak of coronavirus and racism
Chinese migrants in Italy assess their options amid outbreak of coronavirus and racism